Week of October 5, 2015: The answer is…The Showroom

 DSCN3442Location: 132 East Church Street, Martinsville, VA 24112

The Showroom was built in 1965 and is classified as a corporate commercial building. This specific corporate commercial building has been done in the Mediterranean Revival style. The Mediterranean Revival style, as seen in these pictures, is defined by the building being faced in stark white or pastel colored walls. These colors cover the structural system of wood or concrete block; in the example of The Showroom it is brick that has been painted. Mediterranean Revival style is influenced by the architecture of Greece, Spain and Italy. The characteristics of the corporate commercial structure style represents only buildings that are part of a chain and have a specific use tied to the business. Corporate commercial style is used to classify buildings that are built for the purpose of showing off commercial goods.

Structurally, The Showroom is built in a u-shape; it has two wings that create a courtyard in front of the structure. The building is constructed using brick that has been painted white, this effect creates a light feeling to the building. The allusion to the Doric order of columns that surround the windows have a patina that adds to the feel of the Mediterranean style on The Showroom. There is also an echo to this Mediterranean style seen through the dentils that run along the cornice of the building. The windows of The Showroom are large picture windows that allow light in and allow the displayed furniture to be seen. The corporate commercial style is seen through the way the building is designed; it is built to display the furniture. This style is built to serve the purpose of enticing shoppers to buy the merchandise.

DSCN3450Detail of the iron globe around the lights outside of The Showroom.

DSCN3443The large glass windows with Grecian details. Note the green color which adds to the allusion of patina in the window detail.

DSCN3449Detail of the large glass windows.

To find a listing of all the buildings in Martinsville that have been nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, click on the link below:
http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Cities/register_Martinsville.htm

To access the listing for Martinsville Historic District, click on the link below:
http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Cities/Martinsville/120-5001_Martinsville_HD_1998_Final_Nomination.pdf
To learn more about architectural styles:
http://architecturestyles.org
To learn more about Mediterranean Revival style
http://www.ci.glendale.ca.us/planning/pdf_files/HistoricDistrictsDesignGuidelines/council%20draft%20HDDG/11_Mediterranean.pdf

Be on the lookout for the next architectural treasure clue.

Week of October 5, 2015 – back in the City of Martinsville

Treasure Hunt of Local Architectural Details

How to play: At the beginning of each week, a photo of an architectural detail will be released on the blog. Think you know what building it comes from? A structure can be a building, a bridge, an arch, a sculpture – if it was constructed, it’s a structure. Post your guess in the comment section here on the blog. Later in the week, the location will be revealed, along with a statement about why it’s important.

DSCN3450

Week of September 28, 2015: The answer is…The Fieldale Bridge

  DSCN3567 Route 701 Bridge/ VDOT Bridge NO. 6007, 044-5002

This bridge was located near the historic eastern entrance to Fieldale. It was a narrow two-lane vehicular bridge that spanned the Smith River. This bridge was an example of a truss bridge that was commonly known as Warren Truss Bridge. This style of bridge was patented in 1848 by its designers, James Warren and Willoughby Theobald Monzani. It consists of longitudinal members joined only by angled cross members allowing no individual strut, beam, or tie to be effected by an bending or torsional straining forces but allow tension or compression to happen. The design of this bridge means that strength is combined with the economy of materials.

DSCN3566A close up of the truss that has been moved into Fieldale Park.

The truss bridge replaced the original bridge that was built in 1882 and was a one-lane iron and wood bridge. The 1882 bridge had to be replaced when it fell in 1931. The truss bridge was made of concrete and stone masonry with piers that were constructed of random coursed and uncut stone masonry with concrete addition. The Warren truss bridge was oriented east to west and spanned 210 feet across the Smith River. It had a steel superstructure and an external sidewalk that had a simple two-pipe railing. The Warren truss bridge has been replaced with a new and wider bridge.

134494-LThe Warren truss bridge before it was removed.

The Warren truss bridge was removed in 2009. One of the trusses has been placed in the Fieldale park; it is only part of the truss. The truss was broken into two parts to be placed in the park as a memorial to the previous bridge.

To find a listing of all the buildings in Martinsville that have been nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, click on the link below.
http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Cities/register_Martinsville.htm
To access the listing for Martinsville Historic District, please follow
http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Cities/Martinsville/120-5001_Martinsville_HD_1998_Final_Nomination.pdf the link below.
To learn more about architectural styles:
http://architecturestyles.org
Be on the lookout for the next architectural treasure clue.

Week of September 28, 2015 – We’re moving into Henry County for this one.

Treasure Hunt of Local Architectural Details

How to play: At the beginning of each week, a picture of an architectural detail will be released on the blog. Think you know what building it comes from? A structure can be a building, a bridge, an arch, a sculpture – if it was constructed, it’s a structure. Post your guess in the comment section. On Thursday, the location will be revealed, along with a statement about why it’s important.

DSCN3566

Week of September 14, 2015: The answer is…The Jefferson Plaza

DSCN3433Location: 10 East Church Street, Martinsville, VA

The Jefferson Plaza was once the Hotel Jefferson. It was built in 1927 but has been converted into multiple uses. It has housed classrooms for Patrick Henry Community College, the New College Institute, the Piedmont Governor’s School for Math, Science, and Technology, and many business offices and services. The Jefferson Plaza has recently had a new restaurant open, Serendipity. The building has evolved to suit the needs of the community and is listed as a contributing structure to the Martinsville Historic District.

The structure is brick and has several classical elements. Some of these classical elements can be seen in the cornice. A cornice is a decorative piece of molding that wraps around the entire building. Beneath the cornice there is a molding that has large dentils. The dentils are another common feature that add to the revival style. Above the second and third story windows of the Jefferson Plaza, there are pediments with keystones carved into them. The window sills are made of the same material, limestone.

DSCN3432

To find a listing of all the buildings in Martinsville that have been nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, click on the link below.
http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Cities/register_Martinsville.htm
To access the listing for Martinsville Historic District, please follow
http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Cities/Martinsville/120-5001_Martinsville_HD_1998_Final_Nomination.pdf the link below.
To learn more about architectural styles:
http://architecturestyles.org
Be on the lookout for the next architectural treasure clue.

Week of September 21, 2015

Treasure Hunt of Local Architectural Details

How to play: At the beginning of each week, a picture of an architectural detail will be released on the blog. Think you know what building it comes from? A structure can be a building, a bridge, an arch, a sculpture – if it was constructed, it’s a structure. Post your guess in the comment section. On Thursday, the location will be revealed, along with a statement about why it’s important.

DSCN3432

Can you guess what building this architectural detail is from? Enter your answer in the comments.

Week of September 14, 2015: The answer is…Rucker’s Antique Emporium and Auction House

DSCN3439Location: 20 East Church Street, Martinsville, VA

Significance of the building: Rucker’s Antiques Emporium and Auction House is a brick and stucco structure built in 1930. When the building was constructed it was originally a Montgomery Ward and Company store. This building was constructed using brick however the first story of the building has been covered in stucco. The windows are inset on the building. The structure has brick dentils between the two stories. There is a parapet and has classical plaster tiles placed into the brick. The parapet is a low protective wall that is along the roofline. It can be classified as an extension of the wall at the edge of a roof, terrace, balcony, or other part of the structure. On Rucker’s Antiques Emporium and Auction House there is a parapet that is rounded at the top. There are three rounded parapets on the building and the center one is larger than the other two. Each parapet has a plaster detail inlaid. The center plaster detail has a Grecian ethereal woman as the subject. On either side of this tile is a small title with leaves motif. The other parapets just contain a geometric pattern surrounded by molding. There have been some changes made to this building over the years; the stucco has been done to the first level of the building. The first level also has had some windows in filled.

DSCN3438The plaster statue built into the structure

Currently the building is being restored. There are colors being added to the trim and the plaster -work that is on the building. Rucker’s Antiques Emporium and Auction House is listed as a contributing structure to the Martinsville Historic District.

To find a listing of all the buildings in Martinsville that have been nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, National Register Listings in Martinsville.

To access the listing for Martinsville Historic District,  Martinsville Historic District Final Nomination.

To learn more about architectural styles, Architectural Styles.

Be on the lookout for the next architectural treasure clue next week.

Week of September 14, 2015

Treasure Hunt of Local Architectural Details

How to play: At the beginning of each week, a picture of an architectural detail will be released on the blog. Think you know what building it comes from? A structure can be a building, a bridge, an arch, a sculpture – if it was constructed, it’s a structure. Post your guess in the comment section. On Thursday, the location will be revealed, along with a statement about why it’s important.

DSCN3438

Can you guess what building this architectural detail is from? Enter your answer in the comments.

Week of September 6, 2015: The answer is…. The Historic Henry County Courthouse

DSCN3467

Location: Historic Henry County Courthouse, 1 East Main Street, Martinsville, VA

Significance of architectural element: The Court House is a classical Federal style design. The federal style was popular between 1780 and 1850. This style was created in Scotland by the Adam brothers and was based on the plans of houses and palaces in Italy. The interior spaces that are created in this style are usually hexagonal, oval, and circular forms.
The two-story portico is supported with unornamented columns known as the Tuscan order columns, the Tuscan order is a classical order of columns that are unornamented and lack the triglyph detail on the cornice. The columns are supporting an entablature, part of a classical order that sits on top of the columns that is constructed of three different components the architrave, the frieze, and the cornice. Atop the entablature is the pediment. There is a Chippendale fence that wraps around the second story porch. The two side doors have pilasters that match the columns and a pediment above the door. Each window has a keystone over the window and a limestone sill beneath. The Court House is constructed out of brick with plaster details. The two-story pediment has a medallion in the center. The windows above the doors are lead lined in the panes.

DSCN3466Detail of Second Story Railing

The Court House is now the Martinsville-Henry County Heritage Center & Museum. The grounds of the Court House have been landscaped by the Garden Club of Virginia with assistance of Martinsville City. This courthouse was constructed in 1824 by Samuel W. Taliaferro and designed by George Tucker. The first courthouse was constructed in 1793 and was made out of logs. The 1793 courthouse was painted red, white, and blue. In 1824 the new courthouse was constructed out of brick with a pedimented-gable roof and a two-story portico supported with Doric columns and had a flat roof. There were two exterior staircases that led to the second story courtroom. In the 20th century a grand central exterior staircase replaced the two staircases. In 1929 the courthouse was enlarged to encase the 1824 structure, the pedimented gable roof was extended over the portico.

DSCN3468Detail of lead design found in the transom above each of the side doors

To find a listing of all the buildings in Martinsville that have been nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, National Register Listings in Martinsville.

To access the listing for Martinsville Historic District,  Martinsville Historic District Final Nomination.

To learn more about architectural styles, Architectural Styles.

Be on the lookout for the next architectural treasure clue next week.

Week of September 6, 2015

Treasure Hunt of Local Architectural Details

How to play: At the beginning of each week, a picture of an architectural detail will be released on the blog. Think you know what building it comes from? A structure can be a building, a bridge, an arch, a sculpture – if it was constructed, it’s a structure. Post your guess in the comment section. On Thursday, the location will be revealed, along with a statement about why it’s important.

Can you guess what building this architectural detail is from?

DSCN3466